Five of the Best . . . Moon novels!

25 January 2016

Look no further: today on the Gateway blog we have five of the best moon-based novels you could ever hope to read . . .

 

A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke
Time is running out for the passengers and crew of the tourist cruiser Selene, incarcerated in a sea of choking lunar dust. On the surface, her rescuers find their resources stretched to the limit by the mercilessly unpredictable conditions of a totally alien environment. A brilliantly imagined story of human ingenuity and survival.

 

Moon Base by E. C. Tubb
On the airless surface of the Moon the ‘cold war’ continues, with the bases of the major world powers watching each other and waiting… The dedicated personnel of Britain’s Moon Base seemed well-adjusted to their peculiar existence despite a series of mysterious happenings. What bothers them most is the visit of a Royal Commission sent by an economically-worried British Government to investigate expenditure. Travelling with the Commission, but under separate and secret orders, is Felix Larsen, whose investigations are of quite a different nature.

 

Outlaws of the Moon by Edmond Hamilton
The sorrowful cry spread throughout the Solar System. Captain Future and his Futuremen had been missed for months. There was little hope that they’d ever be seen again… A scheming scientist headed for the moon. Now was his chance to find the Futuremen’s hideaway and steal their highly guarded secrets, secrets that could control the Universe. No one could stop him – not even the sinister lunar creatures – now that Captain Future was dead!

 

The Moon is Hell by John W. Campbell
John W. Campbell was the man who made modern science fiction what it is today. As editor of Astounding Stories (later Analog), Campbell brought into the field such all-time greats as Asimov, Heinlein, Sturgeon and many others, while his own writing blazed new trails in science fiction reading pleasure. The Moon is Hell is this great writer-editor’s vision of the first men on the moon – written 18 years before Neil Armstrong made history. This is the story of the American space programme – not as it happened, but as it might have been.

 

The Trouble with Tycho by Clifford D. Simak
Prospecting on the Moon was grim, dangerous and usually unrewarding, only most of the green-horns who came to try didn’t find out until after they got there. Chris Jackson was no exception. He put everything he owned and could borrow into this, and he’d be ruined if he failed. His only chance meant going into Tycho – where three expeditions had already disappeared. He could try, but would he come out again?

About Darren Nash

I'm Digital Publisher at Gollancz, responsible for the SF Gateway and SF Masterworks. Digitally, I can be found here, on Twitter at @SFGateway (officially) and @thenashmeister (unofficially). In meat space, I operate from a secret base inside a dormant volcano, on a remote pacific island that - mysteriously - doesn't appear on any official maps. Possibly. View all posts by Darren Nash → This entry was posted in Commentary, Masterworks and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.