Thoughts from the SF Gateway

Something in the Water VI: Even More Bornying

30 November 2015

Because YOU demanded it**: the return of our semi-regular feature in which we marvel at how The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction‘s excellent On This Day function makes for fascinating reading and, occasionally throws up days with an infeasibly high level of cool people being born. And, one of those days – at the risk of disagreeing with the heir of Elendil – it is, in fact, this day.

Setting our TARDIS to ’30th November, Whenever’, our first stop is 1667, and the birth, in Dublin, Ireland, of satirist and poet Jonathan Swift, who gave us – among many fine and incisive works – Gulliver’s Travels.

Moving forward a couple of centuries, we arrive in Florida, Missouri, in 1835 to greet the arrival of one Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known to the world at large as Mark Twain – author of several American classics including, of special interest to Gateway readers, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

Barely worth engaging the dematerialisation circuit to skip forward a scant four decades to 1874, and the birth of one of the great figures of 20th century history: Sir Winston Churchill. Quite apart from his extraordinary achievements in the political realm and his inspirational oratory, Churchill was responsible for a remarkable body of literary work. Although best known for his memoirs and histories, for which he received the Nobel Prize for Literature, he also wrote a novel: Savrola: A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania, described by The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction as ‘a Ruritanian story set in an imaginary European republic as a civil war rages’ – and therefore officially, ‘one of ours’!

Moving forward to 1937 – just three years before Churchill would take office and leave his indelible mark on world affairs – we find ourselves in South Shields, Tyne and Wear, for the birth of Ridley Scott, sculpter of SF cinema visions par excellence.

And finally, that noise you can hear is the TARDIS materialising in London in 1950, where the man who would help create one of the biggest franchises in the modern comics field, Chris Claremont, was born.

So. If you want a satirical novel about mutants sailing the Mississippi in an attempt to defeat the Nazis, stylishly filmed and available in a Director’s Cut, 30th November is your date. There must have been something in the water . . .

**Or, perhaps more correctly, failed to demand that we stop it . . .

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Posted in Anniversaries, Whimsy
Comments: 2

ICYMI: From the Attic III: Connie Willis

27 November 2015

As previously noted, we will be republishing noted critic and reviewer Kev McVeigh’s ‘From the Attic’ columns over the coming weeks, to give new readers the opportunity to encounter his sage observations on some very important and all-too-often overlooked authors . . .

 

The novels of Connie Willis are popular enough that maybe I don’t need to tell you about them, but how about her short fiction? Time Is The Fire is the first UK collection of Willis’ shorter fiction and features ten stories originally published between 1982 and 2005. Eight of them won the Hugo Award, the other two were amongst the five that picked up Nebulas. That’s some record.

So this is a collection subtitled ‘The Best Of Connie Willis’, although qualified (sub-subtitled, as it were) on the cover as ‘The Hugo and Nebula Award-Winning Short Fiction’. What makes it so good? Are there recurrent themes that explain Willis’ huge popularity?

Lisa Tuttle has a go in her introduction, identifying a number of Willis protagonists on quixotic quests:

worrying that they’ve misunderstood something important, and consumed by the certainty that there is little time left to get it right. Sometimes these quirky quests are personal obsessions, but sometimes (because these are science fiction stories) the fate of the whole world may hinge on the timely discovery of the right clue by one bright yet basically powerless person.

For me that is one of the charms of the best of these stories, that Willis’ characters aren’t omnicompetent superheroes but closer to ‘ordinary’ people. It is also one of the annoyances, as Willis then frequently creates implausible setups for them. Looking at ‘Fire Watch’ from a rational, traditional SF position the premise that a historian who studied St. Paul could mistakenly be sent back in time to St.Paul’s Cathedral during the blitz is borderline ridiculous, but Willis isn’t that kind of writer. As others have noted, her model is often closer to Golden Age Hollywood’s screwball comedies than to Golden Age Campbellian SF. ‘Fire Watch’ even makes this opposition clear when the narrator challenges his tutor over the examination focus on numbers rather than people’s lives.

The other stories of history here (they aren’t historicals as some would have it, but stories about history) are funnier than ‘Fire Watch’ and less poignant. ‘The Winds Of Marble Arch’ has a farcical runaround plot about conference attendees trying to arrange theatre tickets and some classic screwball banter where Willis shows off her love for the Underground. Interspersed with this are echoes of the Blitz seeping through from the past in ‘winds’ through the station tunnels. It isn’t a serious story on the surface, Willis’ London is romanticised and unrealistic for comic effect, but in contrasting this with the haunting winds there is a serious point about theme-park history and tourism. ‘Inside Job’ meanwhile has a fake medium who is actually genuinely channeling HL Mencken (of whom poignant is the least appropriate adjective.) Mencken may be less familiar to UK readers and this story perhaps suffers for that.

And then there is ‘The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation Of Two Of Emily Dickinson’s Poems: A Wellsian Perspective’ a mock-scholarly piece on the belle of Amherst encountering Wells‘ martians. Laden with footnotes, and of course footnotes on footnotes, it has some of Willis’ most directly funny writing.

(As an aside, and referring more to the novels, her much praised historical accuracy is nothing of the sort, she gets so many easy details badly wrong that some readers cannot immerse themselves.)

Several of these stories are slow-burning, taking 50 or more pages not to transmit an idea but to build relationships and settings. The stories of history go to lengths to create a sense of verisimilitude. The comedies focus on dialogue and comic juxtapositions. The unusual Christmas story, ‘All Seated On the Ground’ is like that. Willis plays the screwball card again. Stock characters are played with whilst a romance develops, the author shows off her detailed knowledge of Carols, and a point is made about communication with aliens and with other humans.

Less romantic, and in some ways less impressive are the older stories here. ‘Fire Watch’, ‘Even The Queen’ and ‘A letter From The Clearys’ date from 1982. The latter is reminiscent of stories I’ve read by Eudora Welty and by Kit Reed (acknowledged here by Willis in her various comments.) It is a post-apocalyptic story that reveals its darker side between the lines, but doesn’t quite surprise and doesn’t have the quirky pseudo-characterisation of later stories. ‘Even The Queen’ is another story where a regimented society is faced with a revolution based on human actions. The subject matter may have been challenging in 1982 but the basic theme is one SF has mined many times before and since.

My favourite story here is ‘At The Rialto’ which more neatly ties its SF premise to its comic set-up. Again academia comes in for some gentle ribbing, but in a less long-winded way than say ‘The Winds Of Marble Arch’ as Willis plays with quantum theory and hotel booking systems to comic effect.

Time Is The Fire also includes Connie Willis’ own introduction, afterwords to every story, her Worldcon Guest of Honour speech and not one but two SFWA Grand Master speeches. To be honest, you can skip any two of the three speeches and not miss much. The introduction also covers some similar ground, but hey some people like that. A lot of people like Connie Willis too, as exemplified by the list of awards she has won. Your mileage may vary on whether all or some were deserved as truly the ‘best’ stories of their year, and for me, if I was selecting the actual Best of Connie Willis there are stories I’d swap for at least a couple here. (‘Schwartschild Radius’ and ‘All My Darling Daughters’ since you ask.) Nevertheless as one of the few women SF authors to gain consistent attention she deserves this collection. It might be nice to see some critical attention too that judges Willis on her own terms, as a writer of character-driven, romantic, screwball comic SF that makes up in charm, warmth and humour what it occasionally and deliberately neglects in plausibility.

*****

Time is the Fire: The Best of Connie Willis is available as an SF Masterworks paperback and an SF Gateway eBook. You can find more of Connie Willis’ work via her author page on the SF Gateway website and read about her in her entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

First published on the SF Gateway blog 15th January 2014.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Comments: Comments Off on ICYMI: From the Attic III: Connie Willis

On This Day: Ferderik Pohl

26 November 2015

On this day in 1919,  author, editor, literary agent and fan Frederik Pohl was born in New York.

Frederik Pohl, 2008, copyright AllyUnionPohl was a member of the influential SF group The Futurians, along with such major SF figures as Isaac Asimov, James Blish, Damon Knight, C.M. Kornbluth, Judith Merril and Donald Wollheim. Throughout a long and glittering career, he collaborated with some of the (other!) great names of science fiction, including Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Lester del Rey, Jack Williamson and, notably, C.M. Kornbluth on the acclaimed The Space Merchants, among others.

He won the Hugo Award seven times (three times as editor of Galaxy, twice for short fiction, once for the novel Gateway and once as fan writer), the Nebula Award two years running – for Man Plus and Gateway – and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award twice (in 1978 for Gateway and in 1985 for The Years of the City). He also won ten career achievement awards, including the SFWA Grand Master Award in 1993, and was inducted in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 1998.

For more on one of the great figures of the field, we recommend Frederik Pohl’s entry at The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, and his blog, The Way the Future Blogs, a treasure trove of political commentary, personal reminiscences and snapshots of the history of field from one who lived through it.

 

 

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Comments: Comments Off on On This Day: Ferderik Pohl

On This Day: Poul Anderson

25 November 2015

Poul William Anderson was born on this day in Bristol, Pennsylvania, in 1926. Born of Scandinavian parents, he lived in Denmark briefly before the outbreak of the Second World War. He was a SFWA Grand Master, winner of seven Hugo Awards and three Nebulas – and father-in-law of Greg Bear.

In common with some of Gateway’s other fine authors – such as  Sheri S. Tepper, Gordon R. Dickson and Jack VancePoul Anderson was equally at home with SF and Fantasy. Although much of his work falls unambiguously into the science fiction category – including major works, the Flandry and Psychotechnic League series – he received a World Fantasy Award nomination for A Midsummer Tempest and won the British Fantasy Award, for Hrolf Kraki’s Saga.

It is one of the oddities of the award process that his major works of fantasy were not recognised with wins or nominations by the various Fantasy Awards. SF-Fantasy fusion The High Crusade was shortlisted for the 1961 Hugo Award, but the seminal Norse fantasy The Broken Sword – hailed by no less than Michael Moorcock as one of the finest fantasies ever written – has troubled neither juries nor voters. It was, however, selected for inclusion in David Pringle‘s important Modern Fantasy: The Hundred Best Novels and was added to  Gollancz’s re-launched Fantasy Masterworks series last year.

You can find Poul Anderson’s work via his Author page on the SF Gateway website and read about him in his entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Posted in Anniversaries, Authors
Comments: Comments Off on On This Day: Poul Anderson

Gollancz Welcomes William Gibson!

24 November 2015

Not, strictly speaking, SF Gateway news, but exciting enough for us to want to crow about it here: Gollancz has secured the rights to William Gibson‘s Cyberpunk classic, Neuromancer, as well as follow-ups Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive, and story collection Burning Chrome.

From the official press release:

The UK and Commonwealth rights to the four book deal were acquired by chairman of Gollancz, Malcolm Edwards, from John Berlyne at the Zeno Agency on behalf of Martha Millard at Sterling Lord Literistic. The deal reunites Gibson with his first UK publisher and editor.

Malcolm Edwards, chairman of Gollancz, said: ‘Acquiring Neuromancer and Gibson’s other early works was one of the high points of my years at Gollancz in the 1980s and I’m delighted to bring them back where they belong. They remain absolutely key titles in any account of late 20th century science fiction.’

Gibson said: ‘I’m delighted to see Neuromancer and its two sequels, plus Burning Chrome, return to Gollancz, my first UK publisher, and still more so under the excellent auspices of Malcolm Edwards, their original acquiring editor.’

Gibson’s acclaimed first novel, Neuromancer, was the first novel to win the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick Awards – and has gone on to sell more than 6m copies worldwide. Neuromancer appeared on Time magazine’s list of 100 best English-language novels written since 1923 and featured in David Pringle’s seminal Science Fiction: The 100 Best Novels. Books two and three in the Sprawl Trilogy, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive, were also nominated for Hugo and Nebula Awards.

Described as ‘tautly-written and suspenseful’, the fourth book in the deal, Burning Chrome, collects 10 of Gibson’s best short stories. The collection contains ‘Johnny Mnemonic’ (filmed starring Keanu Reeves) and title story ‘Burning Chrome’ – both nominated for the Nebula Award – as well as the Hugo-and-Nebula-nominated stories ‘Dogfight’ and ‘The Winter Market’.

Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive and Burning Chrome will be published in paperback in July 2016, with a hardback of Neuromancer to be published in September 2016 as part of the SF Masterworks series.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Posted in News
Comments: Comments Off on Gollancz Welcomes William Gibson!

New Title Spotlight: Nick and the Glimmung

23 November 2015

Nick and his family are forced to leave Earth in order for him to keep his cat, Horace – because all pets are now banned, as they use up badly needed resources. They settle on Plowman’s Planet, where they discover a variety of strange and wonderful alien lifeforms.

But not all of these weird lifeforms are benevolent – and the family is involved in a series of increasingly dangerous mishaps. Can Horace and Nick manage to outwit the Wub, the Werjes, the Trobes – and the most dangerous of all, the Glimmung?

“>

paperback | eBook

Philip K. Dick’s only children’s book, first published after his death, brings together many of his most famous alien creations in one gently humorous tale.

You can find more of Philip K. Dick’s work via his Author page on the SF Gateway website and read about him in his entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Posted in New Releases
Comments: Comments Off on New Title Spotlight: Nick and the Glimmung

ICYMI: From the Attic II: Pat Murphy

20 November 2015

As we noted last month, we will be republishing noted critic and reviewer Kev McVeigh’s ‘From the Attic’ columns over the comiong weeks, to give new readers the opportunity to encounter his sage observations on some very important and all-too-often overlooked authors . . .

 

Pat Murphy says her favourite bird is the mockingbird because ‘it never sings the same song twice.’ So far the same can be said of Murphy herself. Some writers find a genre seam and mine it successfully (and some exhaust it sooner than they realise) but Pat Murphy has spent her career questing around the edges of genres often probing in multiple directions at once. It’s an approach made explicit in the title of her first collection Points Of Departure, but most obvious in her strange, brilliant novel Adventures In Time & Space With Max Merriwell. Along the way she has picked up a string of Hugo, Nebula, Locus and Philip K Dick Award nominations. Despite this variation, there are consistent aspects to her fiction that reward her fans richly.

As Emma Bull said:

Pat Murphy’s stories make me look at the world around me, blink, and look again. See what’s there, they say. See what could be there. See what isn’t there, but should be, what must never be there and is.

That’s the thing I love about many of Pat Murphy‘s stories: her protagonists don’t blink in the face of the fantastic but openly engage with it. Elizabeth Butler is not threatened by the Mayan ‘ghosts’ she sees in The Falling Woman. Jennifer in ‘About Fairies’ assumes that fairies exist because why wouldn’t they? And Mrs Jenkins knows that ‘A Falling Star Is A Rock From Outer Space’ but is also able to accept that her falling star is more than that. It is this equipoise that allows the artists of The City, Not Long After to use imagination to defeat an enemy unable to see beyond imagination.

That liminality, the way Murphy rather than have a foot in fantasy and a foot in reality actually crosshatches them, is something rare in SFF. She doesn’t straddle genres but melds them. There And Back Again for instance, sort of looks like The Hobbit retold as a steampunk space opera version of The Hunting Of The Snark with feminism, pataphysics, and a knowing cleverness that adds bite to its amiable charm. On the other hand Adventures In Time & Space With Max Merriwell is a romantic murder thriller on a Love Boat avatar in the Bermuda triangle all explained by quantum mechanics. And a direct sequel to There And Back Again and to Wild Angel the story of a young woman brought up by wolves in gold rush California. There And Back Again we are told, is actually written by somebody called Max Merriwell.

Pat Murphy & Max Merriwell?

Wild Angel credits a Mary Maxwell, and in Adventures we meet a third Murphy pseudonym, thriller writer Weldon Merrimax. In what I want to call hyperphery Murphy has one of her pseudonyms as a ‘real’ character whilst the other two are both real and illusory, carried over from the earlier books and jousting for pre-eminence, meanwhile a character called Pat Murphy (there’s also a Patrick) resolves things with scientific explanations straight from the real Pat Murphy‘s work at the San Francisco science museum The Exploratorium. Then the wolves appear . . . clearly Murphy is having fun and so does her reader.

Earlier in her career, the Nebula award-winning The Falling Woman (now reprinted as a Fantasy Masterwork) approaches time in the same manner. On an archaeological dig in the Yucatan Elizabeth Butler (a rare middle-aged woman protagonist in SFF) sees a woman from a 1000 years ago and the woman can see Elizabeth. Murphy uses this to debunk a few misconceptions about Mayans, about women, and as these misconceptions are Anglo-American in origin, by doing so she ultimately neatly punctures some of white America’s myths about itself. Confused? You won’t be. It’s a charming, poignant, wistful book and an important one too.

American myths of the need and the desire to rebuild America post-holocaust are prominent in SF, and at the time of Murphy’s third novel, The City, Not Long After were a popular trend. (Think David Brin‘s The Postman for instance.) I hope it’s not considered derogatory to label The City, Not Long After as a novel that could only have been told about California and about San Francisco. It has a free spirited imagination and a glorious non-violent response to military aggression (see also Murphy’s friend Lisa Goldstein‘s equally brilliant A Mask For The General) that fits perceptions of that city perfectly. It may sound twee, but Murphy’s ideas influenced by the likes of Stelarc are intriguing, bringing art and technology together in social contexts and she is realist enough to offer a truly shocking ending.

At shorter length Murphy’s body of short fiction collected in Points Of Departure is so good that it became not only the only collection to win the Philip K Dick Award but the only one ever shortlisted to date. Here are tales of ‘The Women In The Trees’ a simple tale of an unhappy wife’s escape made powerful by second-person telling; of a dead young woman whose identity is transplanted into a chimpanzee in the unforgettable Nebula winner ‘Rachel In Love’; of a man planting ‘His Vegetable Wife’ from a seed which Karen Joy Fowler called a ‘nasty’ story; and those people who live between realities ‘On The Dark Side Of The Station Where The Train Never Stops.’ There are fantasies, straight SF, twists upon classic tropes and remarkable new ideas told mostly without flash but a crystalline core that sustains the visionary surrounds.

Although each of Pat Murphy‘s works are so different from each other, and in many ways different from any other SFF around, they resemble genre works in ways that make them instantly recognisable. At the same time their liminality, the deeply embedded crosshatching of time streams, of genres, of realities, of characters, challenges our worldviews the way SFF is supposed to do. Occasionally I’m tempted to say that the layers of Murphy’s storying mean that even individual stories don’t always look like themselves. Take how the romantic comedy of Adventures In Time & Space is really a serious depiction of quantum mechanics, or a tense thriller. “Each of us looks for patterns in his own way.” Elizabeth Butler writes in The Falling Woman and later “A society defines what is normal and what is crazy – and then says anyone who challenges the definition is crazy . . . Each culture defines its idiosyncrasies and then forgets that it has done so.” Pat Murphy is our perfect crazy-normal reminder that our patterns change as we change and we can leave them behind to create new ones or indeed that they need not be consecutive patterns but concurrent. Elizabeth does this with the return of her daughter into her life; Pat Murphy the character imposes the patterns of quantum physics upon the fictional characters around her (and in doing so tells us she knows it is a pattern i.e. fiction.); Bailey Beldon may go There And Back Again in a pre-established pattern from Tolkien, but his pattern is equally Carroll’s Snark and Campbell’s Hero; and the irony is of course that they are all Pat Murphy‘s patterns.

‘About Fairies’ one of Murphy’s most recent stories, sums much of this up for me.

“My name is Jennifer. I am on my way to a toy company in Redwood City to have a meeting about fairies.” For Jennifer though the fairies are not the Disneyfied Tinkerbelles with pink dresses and sparkles but dark, amoral or even malevolent. “Tiffany’s fairies drink dewdrops and sip nectar from flowers. Mine prefer protein.” They may also be real or a virtual creation. A child’s imagination or a means of facing death. “People believe what they want to believe” Jennifer says at one point. Pat Murphy, ultimately, offers us not merely a choice of truths. Most authors do that. She offers us truths we have not seen previously and she shows how those truths co-exist, often uneasily but symbiotically. She writes serious feminist Fantasy that is also charming funny romantic SF at the same time as it is gripping thriller and even absorbing science demonstrations. You may learn from them or just enjoy them . . . I did both.

**********

You can find many of the titles mentioned above via Pat Murphy’s author page on the SF Gateway, and read more about her in her entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

This post was originally published 19th November 2013.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Comments: Comments Off on ICYMI: From the Attic II: Pat Murphy

Masterworks Spotlight: Nova

19 November 2015

A stunning space opera from the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning Grand Master, Samuel R. Delany.

The balance of galactic power in the 31st century revolves around Illyrion, the most precious energy source in the universe. Captain Lorq van Ray’s varied and exotic crew know their mission is dangerous, but they have no idea of Lorq’s secret obsession: to gather Illyrion at source by flying through the very heart of an imploding star.

 

SF Masterworks paperback | SF Gateway eBook

 

Samuel Ray ‘Chip’ Delany, Jr is one of the great voices of modern SF. Born in Harlem in 1942, he published his first novel at the age of just 20. As author, critic and academic, his influence on the modern genre has been profound and he remains one of science fiction’s most important and discussed writers. He has won the Hugo Award twice and the Nebula Award four times, including consecutive wins for Babel-17 and The Einstein Intersection. Since January 2001 he has been a professor of English and Creative Writing at Temple University in Philadelphia, where he is Director of the Graduate Creative Writing Program.

You can find more of Samuel R Delany’s work via his Author page on the SF Gateway website and read about him in his entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Comments: Comments Off on Masterworks Spotlight: Nova

New Title Spotlight: Supernatural Stories featuring The Phantom Crusader

18 November 2015

A little over two years ago, we dipped our pen in purple ink and proclaimed thusly:

Have you ever thrilled to the SF adventures of Lionel Roberts?  Raced breakneck through the breathless prose of Leo Brett?  Indulged in the macabre tales of Bron Fane 0r the galaxy-spanning stories of Pel Torro? Does the name John E. Muller mean anything to you?  What about Karl Zeigfreid? Trebor Thorpe?

Believe it or not, the prodigious output of all of the above – and more! – is down to one man: R L Fanthorpe. To quote The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction:

From 1954 to 1965 Fanthorpe was an sf writer of remarkable productivity, towards the end of that period producing novels on a weekly schedule for Badger Books, an imprint of John Spencer and Co . . . It has been claimed of Fanthorpe that for the years in which he wrote, chiefly 1958 to 1965, he was the world’s most prolific writer in the genre.

Why do we share this knowledge with you? Because the SF Gateway is delighted to announce that R L Fanthorpe – including all his bewildering array of pen names – is joining the SF Gateway!

Ending with the portentous (or not, depending on your portent threshold):

And heed well the words of Neil Gaiman: “Do not read too much Lionel Fanthorpe at one go, your brains will turn to guacamole and drip out of your ears”

 

Now . . .  judge for yourself!  One of our current New Titles Spotlights is issue 75 of Supernatural Stories featuring ‘The Phantom Crusader’!

THRILL! to title story ‘The Phantom Crusader’: A skeleton figure gleamed beneath the ancient armour.

VISIT! ‘The Room that Never Was’: The door had been there the night before … and now there was nothing.

BRAVE! ‘The Tunnel’: Faint and far beneath them, they could hear the unmistakable sounds…

WITNESS! ‘Stranger in the Skill’: There was someone at the door, someone strangely, frighteningly familiar.

ENCOUNTER! ‘The Stockman’: Psychic justice … strange but sure …

BEHOLD! ‘Footprints in the Sand’: There was nothing but wilderness for a thousand square miles. What had made the prints?

And, hey, try to keep a sense of perspective, OK?

You can find more of R L Fanthorpe’s work via his Author page on the SF Gateway website and read about him in his entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Comments: Comments Off on New Title Spotlight: Supernatural Stories featuring The Phantom Crusader

New Title Spotlight: Xeelee: Vacuum Diagrams

16 November 2015

New to ebook, this collection of classic space opera stories is a vital part of the magesterial Xeelee sequence, from the multi-award-winning writer and co-author (with Terry Pratchett) of the bestselling Long Earth series . . .

 

Return to the eon-spanning and universe-crossing conflict between humanity and the unknowable alien Xeelee in this collection of stories, available in ebook for the first time!

Baxter’s future history, known as the Xeelee sequence, is an exemplar of the form: it comprises his first four novels – Raft, Timelike Infinity, Flux and Ring – and these marvellous linked stories, as well as those in the new collection Xeelee: Endurance.

hardback | trade paperback | eBook

 

You can find more of Stephen Baxter’s work via his Author pages on the Gateway and Orion websites, and read about him in his entry in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Email
  • Print
Posted in Authors, New Releases
Comments: Comments Off on New Title Spotlight: Xeelee: Vacuum Diagrams
1 2